Ideas for Using Animal Prints in Home Decor

by | Jun 2, 2018

Humans seem to love other animals. In the United States alone, it is difficult to find a person who doesn’t love animals in one form or another. It is estimated that nearly 3 in 4 Americans owns some kind of animal. Millions of Americans volunteer in animal rescue shelters, in zoos and in national parks caring for and protecting animals. Because Americans love their animals so much, it is not a surprise that many Americans use animal prints to decorate rooms in their homes. However, there are tricks to using fabric and art with animal themes, so that your room looks tasteful and not tacky. With some well-placed animal prints, your room can showcase your love for animals without sacrificing the overall design of your living space.

Fabric Animal Prints

First, mixing animal art with animal print fabric can be done in the same room if they are both used sparingly. For example, designers have used neutral shades, such as gray, ivory or khaki on the walls of a room, and then used animal art prints paired with other design elements within a room. Designers have favored animal art prints, such as Amy Hamilton’s animal prints, paired with neutral furniture and a few animal print pillows mixed in with other fabrics to create a look that showcases a love for animals without overwhelming a room. Hamilton’s use of watercolors rather than bold shades also allows you to use more than one art print without swallowing walls in a room with color overload.

Whimsical Animal Prints

Second, animal art can be displayed in a variety of design schemes. Often, steampunk uses whimsical animals as part of its design format, with colors and themes of either the Victorian era, or of the American Wild West. Because the steampunk tradition uses mostly a neutral palette, it is easy to display animal art within steampunk without making the animal art an eyesore. Examples of whimsical animal art in the steampunk tradition can be found here. The animal art used in steampunk varies from art posters to art prints, and animal themes in art vary from animals displayed doing unusual activities to animals in unusual places to whimsical animal groupings.

Animal Prints with a Cause

Animal art can also be used within a room to showcase environmental or conservation causes that you are passionate about. For example, tigers, rhinos and elephants are frequently used in art, such as the examples here, and can be paired with posters or pictures of these animals in the wild, or conservation posters that examine the impact humans have had on the lives of the animals, or conservation activities to save the animals from extinction. When used as a mode of communication, animal art can display beauty and a call to action for those who are passionate about animal welfare. Animal art prints could also be used as an overall nature-inspired design theme, and paired with art or photographs that display a love of national parks or travel in general, such as the art prints seen here.

Whatever your love of wildlife looks like–whether it is a love of domestic animals or endangered species, animal prints can be used to showcase that love and celebrate it in art form.

MORE FROM THE BLOG

I Need My Space

Do you ever feel like you are just too crowded? Like there are so many people and places and things in your way that you would just give anything to be able to have a few minutes of solitude. One of our co-workers, who has three children under the age of 6, was...

read more

Scandal

  We have been thinking a lot about scandal lately here at Fine Art America. Sometimes, it seems like scandals are uniquely American, but we are not alone. Scandals take place all over the world, all of the time. Currently, there are several scandals brewing you might...

read more

Wood You Knot?

  Here at Fine Art America, we have noticed that people’s tastes change over time, and that recently, lots of people are just crazy about buying photographs and paintings on wood rather than paper. While paper is a beautiful medium for art – do not get us wrong – some...

read more